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A new rifle engineered for the serious female hunter.

by Diana Rupp

With the introduction of the new Model 11/111 Lady Hunter, Savage Arms is one of the first rifle manufacturers to design a rifle specifically for women. Most gunmakers seem to think a “lady’s” rifle is just a standard rifle with the stock cut down and maybe some pink highlights, but the engineers at Savage consulted with serious women hunters (yours truly included) and discovered that there is a lot more to it than that.

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Augusta Wallihan was a hunter, wildlife photographer, adventurer, and conservationist.

By Diana Rupp

When I first saw the photograph of Augusta Wallihan entitled “Grocery Shopping,” I was intrigued and had to find out more. Who was this woman, dressed in the garb of the late 1800s and standing over a very nice mule-deer buck with a skinning knife and a Remington Hepburn rifle, exuding an air of confidence and competence?

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Question:


I have both a .300 Win Mag and .375 H&H. What bullet weight and bullet type would you recommend for each for plains game? For a plains-game hunt only, which rifle would you take?

 

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Question:


My brother will be accompanying me and my Dad on our trip to Zimbabwe to hunt dangerous game.  He will only be hunting plains game while he was there. He currently has a Ruger 77 in .270. He is in great physical shape but early in his life suffered from a brain tumor, seizures, and car wreck. I wanted to get him a rifle with a little more horsepower but I do not want him to develop a flinch or mess up his shooting confidence. Any suggestions on caliber?

 


Answer:

 

I think you are on the right track because the .270 is, in my opinion, not the ideal cartridge for plains game in what will be relatively short distance, bushveld conditions.


For smaller and medium-sized antelope like springbok, blesbok, and black wildebeest in open country where the shots tend to be longer, the .270 is a good choice, but not for the tougher, larger African antelope species at shorter shooting distances.  This is where you need heavier bullets in the 170- to 180-grain range and the .270 cannot deliver this.

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Outfitters and hunters battle poaching in one of Africa's most famous hunting grounds.

By Brad Fitzpatrick

In 2010, Buzz Charlton and Myles McCallum of Charlton McCallum Safaris were awarded the rights to hunt in the Dande Safari Area and Dande East concessions in Zimbabwe’s Zambezi Valley, two of Africa’s classic dangerous-game hunting destinations. While poaching is an issue throughout the Zambezi Valley, the duo quickly  realized that the situation in Dande East was particularly bad and unless there was immediate action the area’s wildlife would be lost for good. One problem was that the community game scouts went unpaid for most of the year and had minimal resources at their disposal to strike back against organized gangs of armed poachers.

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The Sage Grouse Initiative helps a game bird, improves big-game habitat, and even helps ranchers feed their cattle.

by Diana Rupp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A new study of game management areas in Zambia highlights the importance of the meat provided to local communities by hunting outfitters.

by Diana Rupp

When hunters travel to Africa for a safari hunt, their friends back home often wonder what happens to the meat of the animals they kill. If you’ve been on an African safari, you know that some of the meat is eaten in camp. But most of it, especially in the poorest and most rural areas of the continent, is given to the local communities, where it is a crucial addition to the otherwise protein-deficient diet of much of the populace.

Until now, there have been few, if any, scientific studies attempting to quantify the amount of game meat that goes to local communities and the impact it has. That has changed with a just-published study of three game management areas (GMAs) in several regions of Zambia that assessed the quantity and impact of sport-hunted meat provided to the local communities between 2004 and 2011.

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Expanding bullets made of homogenous alloys behave differently than standard lead projectiles.


By Craig Boddington


The Barnes X Bullet entered the market about a quarter-century ago. It wasn’t exactly the first of its type, but it was definitely the first unleaded, homogenous alloy expanding bullet to gain acceptance among hunters. Mind you, it wasn’t universally accepted! Some praised it, others damned it. Either way, it worked. Absent a core that could be separated, the Barnes X was bound to retain the vast majority of its weight, and it was going to penetrate. The four petals were going to peel back from the nose cavity, creating the cross, or X, that gave the bullet its name. At high velocity, and depending on what was struck, it wasn’t impossible (or even unusual) for one or more petals to break off. If they all broke off, which was unusual, then the remainder of the bullet acted like a solid and continued to penetrate. At low velocity (i.e., at long range after the bullet has slowed) the petals opened less well, and the bullet still performed like a solid.

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Question:

 

Is the .375 Ruger caliber common enough in southern Africa for a hunter to buy ammunition if he had problems in transit and his ammo did not arrive in Africa?

 


Answer:

 

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These four great non-magnum cartridges stand out as being some of the most versatile, useful, and effective rounds ever designed.

By Craig Boddington

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