Sports A Field

Use Enough Scope

But not too much!

Bring or Borrow?

Is it better to bring your own rifle on an overseas hunt, or borrow one?

The Lion's Breath

With a lion just inches away, a hunter faces his darkest fears.

Not Just a Guy Thing

Women are taking to the hunting fields in increasing numbers.

Standard Solutions

Do you really need a magnum cartridge? The old standards still serve us well.

Red Stags of the Rakaia

Hunting free-range red stags and fallow deer in New Zealand.

Land of Enchantment

A pronghorn hunt on the high plains of New Mexico.

More Stories

Rifle Review: Weatherby Vanguard Camilla

Weatherby’s new rifle for women is accurate, elegant, and fun to shoot.

It’s not surprising to me that many of the women I know shoot Weatherby rifles. Their excellent quality and accuracy aside, Weatherby rifles are often built with Monte-Carlo-style stocks

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Saving the Selous

The elephants of the Selous need help, and hunting is critical to their survival.

When Benson Kibonde left his position as chief warden of the Selous Game Reserve in Tanzania in 2008 he thought the days of rampant ivory poaching in Tanzania were long past.

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.270 vs. .30-06

Comparing two tried-and-true big-game cartridges.

The two most popular big-game cartridges among American hunters remain the .270 and .30-06. Neither are exactly new; the .270 was introduced clear back in 1925, while the .30-06 passed its centennial seven years ago (wow!).

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Leading the Way

Many of today’s wildlife management professionals don’t understand hunting, but efforts are underway to change that.

I remember a wildlife biology class I took in college. The class was full of people who were interested in animals, but who didn’t seem to have ever spent much time outdoors. When I showed up for a field trip to a local forest one misty day wearing camo rain gear, I attracted some strange looks from my peers.

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The Lost Lions

How the most famous man-eaters in the history of Africa ended up in the city of Chicago.

The man-eaters of Tsavo, as they can be seen today on display in the Field Museum in Chicago. Photo courtesy of the Field Museum.

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The Power of a Word

Is “trophy” now a lethal adjective for hunting?

I have always believed in the power of words. They have the capacity to inspire us, to lead us to powerful achievements and to great sacrifice. They can carry us to war or encourage us to peace. Weightless and without physical dimension, words remain agile weapons in our search for good and evil, and for truth. Words carry our thoughts.

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Welcome to “The Jungle”

Taxidermist, publisher, and marketing genius, Rowland Ward turned mounted animals into a fashionable sensation during the Victorian Age.

Hunters today know the name Rowland Ward mostly because of the record book that bears his name. But Rowland Ward was a fascinating character in his own right.

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Separate Ways

Wildlife managers try to keep wild sheep healthy by keeping them away from their domestic cousins.

Hunters who may have thought they would never have the opportunity to hunt bighorn sheep were given an incredible opportunity this year.

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A Win for Sage Grouse

The West’s iconic gamebird staves off an ESA listing… for now.

It was a huge victory for one of the most ambitious multi-state conservation efforts ever undertaken: In September, the US Fish & Wildlife Service decided NOT to add the greater sage grouse to the federal endangered species list.

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