Elephant


Africa’s Greatest Tuskers is a new book by Tony Sanchez-Arino that does what no single volume has ever attempted: It lists every known elephant ever taken with at least one tusk of 130 pounds or more and tells the stories of who hunted these elephants, who owns the tusks, or how they were found.

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A pair of the greatest elephant-hunting books ever published are now back in print.

Safari Press recently reprinted two of the great elephant-hunting classics of the post-World War II era. These extraordinary books, Kambaku by Harry Manners and Bell of Africa by W.D.M. Bell, are autobiographical tales of two of the most adventurous hunters who ever walked the elephant trails of the Dark Continent.

Kambaku is the life story of Harry Manners, one of the greatest elephant hunters of all time. Harry was born in South Africa, and his family moved to Portugese East Africa, now Mozambique, when he was six. Harry shot his first elephant when still a teenager, using a 10.75mm Mauser. The bull had tusks of more than 80 pounds per side, and Harry was hooked.

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A PH makes a split-second decision that will mean life or death for him and his client.

By Brad Fitzpatrick

The game trail was a narrow corridor of hard-packed soil beneath a canopy of thorn. It was hard to imagine that three big bull elephants had recently come down this path, but professional hunter Karl Stumpfe stood over their fresh spoor pressed deep into the dirt of the game trail. He strained to see through the interwoven green branches of combretum, but the wall of vegetation was so thick that the elephant bulls less than a dozen yards ahead of the men appeared only as sandy-gray patches moving slowly through the dense cover.

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The Renaissance of Hunting the African Elephant

by Craig Boddington

Craig Boddington's hotly anticipated new book on the African elephant is out, and not surprisingly, it's an excellent read. While there has been plenty written about elephant hunting in the glory days of the early twentieth century, there are few books out that tell the real story of hunting the big tuskers today.

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Question:

I recently read an article about an elephant hunt in 1970 where ownership of the tusks was claimed by possession of the tail, and that the tail hair was used to make a bracelet. I would like to know if this custom is still practiced today.


 
Answer:

Yes, this tradition is still very much alive and practiced to this day.

As you correctly state, the tail of a recently shot elephant is usually cut off and presented to the hunter as a sign of ownership. I am not sure as to the origin of this tradition but it goes back a long way, I believe.

The hairs on the end of an elephant’s tail are stiff, thick, and wire-like, and they are used to fashion bangles. Many who have successfully hunted an elephant wear them as a symbol of their success.

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