Ask Doctari

Question:

 

I am considering a dangerous-game rifle for North America as well as trips to Africa for plains game and buffalo. I would prefer an all-weather rifle. Please give me your recommendations for best rifle and caliber.

 

 


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Question:

 

Thinking back to the old-time ivory hunters who used single-shot rifles (Selous and his .461 Gibbs), would you consider today's modern single-shot rifles like the excellent Ruger No. 1 in the appropriate calibers a viable dangerous game rifle? I do understand the user would have to devote the proper amount of time in practice, both for shot placement and fast reloads.
 


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Question:


I am going to be hunting the Luangwa Valley in Zambia. Species on license are lion, leopard, buffalo, hippo, croc, hyaena, puku, Cookson wildebeest, bushbuck, and some other plains game.

I own a number of rifles: .270 WSM, .300 WSM, .338 WM, 7mm Rem Mag, 9.3x62, .375 H&H, .416 Rigby, and .500 Jeffery bolt actions, and a .470 NE and .500 NE double rifles. I shoot all of the above effectively and all the bolt rifles are equipped with good scopes.

On a 21-day safari and with all the hassles of travelling with firearms, would you opt for a two or three rifle battery? I don't really want to leave a big double rifle at home with three of the Big Five on the menu. How would you advise me on selection of rifles to take? (Zambia allows a maximum of three rifles).

 

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Question:

 

I’m seriously considering buying the Kilimanjaro Doctari rifle. I’m planning on taking my son on safari when he graduates from high school. It will be our first trip. I’m wondering why you chose the .416 Rigby vs. .375 H&H as the smallest caliber offered for a gun with your name on it?  Is it truly the caliber you would recommend to a safari client wanting to shoot Cape buffalo?


 

 

Answer:

 

The development of Kilimanjaro Rifle’s Doctari model was very much a team effort with one goal in mind--to produce the best-looking, most functional, nicest handling, Mauser 98 bolt-actioned PH’s dangerous-game rifle possible--and heck, I think we did it!


At the time, Kilimanjaro already offered the .375 H&H in their model lineup, so it was logical to go the next step caliber-wise, hence the popular .416. For serious dangerous game work, and I’m talking here from a PH’s perspective, the .375 H&H is, I believe, only marginal for stopping and backing shots.

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Question:

 

I plan to hunt in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa come August of 2012.  I plan on taking warthog, zebra, and black wildebeest with a .30-06 Springfield rifle. Is Hornady 185-grain SP and Hornady 165-grain SST ammo adequate for this type of game? Any suggestions?


Answer:

 

The .30-06 Springfield is most certainly adequate for the species you will be hunting in SA’s Northern Cape Province. For warthog and black wildebeest, neither of which are large-bodied animals, either of the two Hornady bullets you mention, 180-grain SP or 165-grain SST, will do just fine if you do your part and place them perfectly.


Zebra are a different matter, especially a big stallion. Granted, many zebra have been taken successfully with .30-caliber 180-grainers, but to be honest, I prefer a bit more bullet weight for these striped equines, especially at what are known as “bushveld” shooting distances--in other words, 100 to 150 paces.

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